buffleheadcabin

kateoplis:

"Forty-one million IQ points. That’s what Dr. David Bellinger determined Americans have collectively forfeited as a result of exposure to lead, mercury, and organophosphate pesticides. In a 2012 paper published by the National Institutes of Health, Bellinger, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, compared intelligence quotients among children whose mothers had been exposed to these neurotoxins while pregnant to those who had not. Bellinger calculates a total loss of 16.9 million IQ points due to exposure to organophosphates, the most common pesticides used in agriculture.”

This “silent pandemic” of toxins is believed to be “causing not just lower IQs, but ADHD and autism spectrum disorder.”

The Toxins That Threaten Our Brains | The Atlantic

moniquill
moniquill:

madamethursday:

[Image: A map drawn according to the Fuller Projection in which the continents are accurately sized and not distributed according to northern and southern hemispheres but are actually projected as if seen from above, make them very closely grouped together and more accurately sized.]
fishingboatproceeds:

memorylikeaweapon:

Can we just take a moment to appreciate the Fuller Projection?
This map presents a world that is nearly contiguous and at accurate sizes and shapes to the continents. And there is no “correct” orientation for it (the directionality of north/south being arbitrary after all )
The downsides are that it cuts up Antarctica and distorts the size of oceans, which is bad news for sailors and penguin researchers, but for geography in general it’s AWESOME
(X)

Created by Buckminster Fuller, writer of a gajillion books, owner of a gajillion patents, and the man whose name gave us Buckyballs.


I seriously love the Fuller Projection because - through no fault of their own - millions of kids go through school systems in so many places (not just the U.S.) with Mercator projection maps that are drawn such that they make North America and Europe look much bigger than they’ve ever really been in actual, factual reality. That projection reduces Africa to being the same size as Greenland.
You look at that big white mass hovering above Canada in this map and then look at the immense, enormous, magnificent size of Africa, or of South America which has never, ever been smaller than North America. That’s what reality is. We’re seriously teaching kids to go by a map that is not representative of the physical reality of the planet upon which we live. 
Every time I see Fuller maps I just wanna go marching back to the school systems I went through with a fiery vengeance and a bullhorn, screaming through the halls, “EXPLAIN THIS BULLSHIT” and then encourage the current students to also demand of their teachers and school systems and parents and other adults who have been miseducating them for years that they EXPLAIN THIS BULLSHIT and not stop until the bullshit is explained.

madamethursday’s tags: (mis)education system,fuller projection,i wish I’d learned this in school when it could’ve saved me from being a detriment to the world and my classmates with less privilege,this is why history and geography teaching are vital on every level,don’t stop until the bullshit is explained

moniquill:

madamethursday:

[Image: A map drawn according to the Fuller Projection in which the continents are accurately sized and not distributed according to northern and southern hemispheres but are actually projected as if seen from above, make them very closely grouped together and more accurately sized.]

fishingboatproceeds:

memorylikeaweapon:

Can we just take a moment to appreciate the Fuller Projection?

This map presents a world that is nearly contiguous and at accurate sizes and shapes to the continents.
And there is no “correct” orientation for it (the directionality of north/south being arbitrary after all )

The downsides are that it cuts up Antarctica and distorts the size of oceans, which is bad news for sailors and penguin researchers, but for geography in general it’s AWESOME

(X)

Created by Buckminster Fuller, writer of a gajillion books, owner of a gajillion patents, and the man whose name gave us Buckyballs.

I seriously love the Fuller Projection because - through no fault of their own - millions of kids go through school systems in so many places (not just the U.S.) with Mercator projection maps that are drawn such that they make North America and Europe look much bigger than they’ve ever really been in actual, factual reality. That projection reduces Africa to being the same size as Greenland.

You look at that big white mass hovering above Canada in this map and then look at the immense, enormous, magnificent size of Africa, or of South America which has never, ever been smaller than North America. That’s what reality is. We’re seriously teaching kids to go by a map that is not representative of the physical reality of the planet upon which we live. 

Every time I see Fuller maps I just wanna go marching back to the school systems I went through with a fiery vengeance and a bullhorn, screaming through the halls, “EXPLAIN THIS BULLSHIT” and then encourage the current students to also demand of their teachers and school systems and parents and other adults who have been miseducating them for years that they EXPLAIN THIS BULLSHIT and not stop until the bullshit is explained.

madamethursday’s tags: (mis)education system,fuller projection,i wish I’d learned this in school when it could’ve saved me from being a detriment to the world and my classmates with less privilege,this is why history and geography teaching are vital on every level,don’t stop until the bullshit is explained

moniquill
Whole Foods is a point of entry into a new version of American whiteness, one which leans on a pseudo recognition of diversity through sanitized food presentation. It offers a new order of “otherness” in which the other is a pleasant-looking piece of food, totally safe, and with a pedigree. Within the Whole Foods’ bubble we are turned instantly sophisticated, and the store becomes the place where we can self-indulge in notions of cosmopolitan openness to world products and political struggles. To buy an avocado “with a background” ends up, dangerously, filling the space of our urge for political awareness. The store did the math for us, as well as all the thinking, so we can “shop with confidence” and just relax.

The whole process does something rather particular: It creates the illusion of an “independent” understanding within the larger implications of corporate intervention in defining a food’s background. In establishing a perimeter of commercial values based on social responsibility, Whole Foods depoliticizes us. Worse, for those already sinking into the hybrid life of a world without politics, it offers a parachute, a sort of immunity: “I shop here so, by extension, I know a thing or two about social awareness.”

Whole Foods unavoidably widens the gap between people who have everything and people who have nothing: How can super expensive foods that look like an invention of Edward Weston’s camera - that the majority of the world cannot afford, or would laugh about - be synonymous with social responsibility? This is truly a modern enigma.

The recent situation with quinoa, the “hot” and “trendy” new grain that we are suddenly unable to live without - and without which we are suddenly missing essential nutrients to keep us alive - is case in point. Paola Flores, filing for the AP from La Paz, Bolivia, reports that “[t]he scramble to grow more (quinoa) is prompting Bolivian farmers to abandon traditional land management practices, endangering the fragile ecosystem of the arid highlands, agronomists say.” A quinoa emergency, then, at the bulk bins. A separate exposé published in the Guardian goes even further: “[T]here is an unpalatable truth to face for those of us with a bag of quinoa in the larder. The appetite of countries such as ours for this grain has pushed up prices to such an extent that poorer people in Peru and Bolivia, for whom it was once a nourishing staple food, can no longer afford to eat it. Imported junk food is cheaper. In Lima, quinoa now costs more than chicken.” Whether we blame vegans or hipsters or the organic food movement or a lack of appropriate trade regulations, the troubling truth about quinoa represents that repetitive drama between the West and rest in which our voracious consumption depletes yet another land and another people.

Whole Foods widens the gaps, and it does so in the most subtle and displacing manner, giving us an environment (the actually sanitized, spotless physical space) that is the embodiment of an elite (yet perceived as “open,” especially through the chain’s less pricey “360” product line) that finds itself at home within a soulless, sterilized experiences. The notion of gentrification has been surpassed, attaining the space of a perennial state of mind. This is where even an apple turns into an object/jewelry of desire, not of need, or at least of normality. In that sense, Whole Foods is simply the last piece in the long, familiar chain of shifting perceptions in neo-capitalistic societies that exploded after the Second World War, in which the creation and multiplication of desires is central to the self-preservation of the system.

"Shipwrecked in Whole Foods"

- neoliberal notions of “you are what you consume”

- consumptive whiteness- the notion of the sophisticated white, western consumer

(via sextus—empiricus)

zuky

dbvictoria:

A Janitor Secretly Worked On This For 7 Years. No One Knew Til Now… And It’s Baffling Everyone.

Over 30 years ago, a man spent 7 years hand-drawing the most complex, unbelievable and probably unsolvable maze I’ve ever seen. His daughter recently posted the following photos on Twitter and, needless to say, the entire Internet is exploding with questions about her dad.

So who is the man behind it? A professor? A mathematician? A wizard? No, no, and no. The correct answer is… the university janitor.

The maze is 34 x 23.3-inches.

Twitter user Kya7y’s dad, who was a janitor at a university in Japan, spent more than 7 years working on this…

To this point, he has remained completely anonymous and wants no public recognition for his phenomenal work.

Art connoisseurs are going crazy over this, both for its artistic brilliance and its impossibility to solve. To think a university janitor was behind this shows that we should never judge anyone by their occupation or position in life. This is awesome work.

To date, no additional information has been shared about the maze or the man behind it. But it’s without a doubt one of the most humble, remarkable creations I’ve ever seen.

Source: Twitter User Kya7y’s / Buy A Copy Of “Papa’s Maze” Here

explore-blog
Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive. The world needs more people who have come alive.

Jonathan Harris explores the turmoils of navigating stuckness. Pair with how to find your purpose and do what you love, then revisit this excellent guide to finding work that makes you come alive

Should all else fail, there’s always this handbook to getting unstuck

(via explore-blog)