zain

farhaaan:

THE MINUTE THAT FOLLOWED MUBARAK’S RESIGNATION: TAHRIR SQUARE EXPLODES INTO CELEBRATION

abcsoupdot
darling80m:

aljazeera:

Pro-democracy protesters continue to pour into Tahrir [Liberation] Square in Cairo. They call for president Mubarak to step down. The Imam during the Friday prayer in the square urged the people to stay strong and stick to their demands. Follow our live blog here: http://aje.me/hXK0Wa

Mubarak reported to have left Cairo with his family, the AFP news agency reports, citing a source close to the government. But it said his destination was not immediately clear.

darling80m:

aljazeera:

Pro-democracy protesters continue to pour into Tahrir [Liberation] Square in Cairo. They call for president Mubarak to step down. The Imam during the Friday prayer in the square urged the people to stay strong and stick to their demands. Follow our live blog here: http://aje.me/hXK0Wa

Mubarak reported to have left Cairo with his family, the AFP news agency reports, citing a source close to the government. But it said his destination was not immediately clear.

inothernews

Hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered in Cairo for a huge rally Friday despite on offer by the army to ensure 30-year-old emergency laws are lifted and free and fair elections held.

The military’s comments were seen as a major push to end the worst crisis in Egypt’s modern history, but also contained a clear signal that it wanted demonstrators off the streets without achieving to their key demand that President Hosni Mubarak quit now.

NBC News reported Friday that Mubarak had left Cairo, citing a high-ranking official and a security source. Both sources said he left from Almaza military airport with his family.

There were unconfirmed reports that he had gone to the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh on Israel’s Channel 10. Mubarak has a villa there and regularly stays there at weekends.

Protesters enraged at Mubarak’s refusal to quit immediately pledged to march from Tahrir (Liberation) Square to the presidential palace Friday, raising fears of a confrontation between elite troops and demonstrators.

In “Communique No. 2” the army said it “confirms the lifting of the state of emergency as soon as the current circumstances end,” a pledge that would remove a law imposed after Mubarak became president following Anwar Sadat’s assassination and that protesters say has long been used to stifle dissent.

mohandasgandhi

thatsglobalizationbitches:

Two intellectual heavyweights weigh in on the Egyptian revolution on AJE’s Riz Khan. Tariq Ramadan - professor of Islamic studies at Oxford and prominent proponent of ‘Western Islam’ - discusses the role of the Muslim Brotherhood, a topic personally close to him, being the grandson of the its founder, Hassan al-Banna,. And with him is the always animated and insightful radical philosopher Slavoj Žižek, who offers up what I think is a pretty good description of what the Egyptian revolution has evoked in many people:

“…There where we are fighting a tyrant, we are all universalists. We are immediately [in] solidarity with each another. That’s how you build universal solidarity. Not with some stupid UNESCO multicultural respect - ‘we respect your culture, your ours’ - it’s the struggle for freedom. Here we have a direct proof a) that freedom is universal and b) especially, a proof against that cynical idea that some how Muslim crowds prefer some kind of religiously fundamentalist dictatorship, whatever. No! What happened in Tunisia, what happens now in Egypt, it’s precisely this universal revolution for dignity, human rights, economic justice …This is universalism at work. What we see daily in Egypt - one Egyptian protester said: ‘I am proud that I am Egyptian.’ I am proud for them, they gave us the lesson against this falsely respectful but basically racist prejudice - ‘oh you know, Arabs, have their specific culture, they cannot really get [democracy].’ They got it, they understand democracy, by doing what they are doing, better than we do in the west.”

insaniyat

afghanipoppy:

 #Jan25


Inspired by the resilience of Egyptian people during their recent uprising, several notable musicians from North America have teamed up to release a song of solidarity and empowerment. The track is fittingly titled “#Jan25” as a reference to both the date the protests officially began in Egypt, and its prominence as a trending topic on Twitter. Produced by Sami Matar, a Palestinian-American composer from Southern California, and featuring the likes of Freeway, The Narcicyst, Omar Offendum, HBO Def Poet Amir Sulaiman, and Canadian R&B vocalist Ayah - this track serves as a testament to the revolution’s effect on the hearts and minds of today’s youth, and the spirit of resistance it has come to symbolize for oppressed people worldwide.

Download

Artist Information:
Omar Offendum (MC #1) - http://twitter.com/Offendum
The Narcicyst (MC #2) - http://twitter.com/TheNarcicyst
Freeway (MC #3) - http://twitter.com/PhillyFreezer
Amir Sulaiman (MC #4) http://twitter.com/AmirSulaiman
Ayah (R&B Vocalist) - http://twitter.com/AyahMusic
Sami Matar (Producer) - http://twitter.com/SamiMatar
Artwork by Ridwan Adhami http://www.ridzdesign.com

think4yourself
pantslessprogressive:

via @EANewsFeed, EA LiveBlog

what’s remarkable to me is that these spineless thugs have the decency to follow through with the arrangement. who can prove that you actually went through with the violence? why not fight for your country and get back at the guy holding your chains? if your that angry, angry enough to fight for money, turn that anger back on those who have you in chains? i’ll never understand these types of people.

pantslessprogressive:

via @EANewsFeed, EA LiveBlog

what’s remarkable to me is that these spineless thugs have the decency to follow through with the arrangement. who can prove that you actually went through with the violence? why not fight for your country and get back at the guy holding your chains? if your that angry, angry enough to fight for money, turn that anger back on those who have you in chains? i’ll never understand these types of people.

azspot

On Wednesday, the Mubarak regime showed its fangs, mounting a massive and violent repressive attack on the peaceful crowds in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo. People worrying about Egypt becoming like Iran (scroll down) should worry about Egypt already being way too much like Iran as it is. That is, Hillary Clinton and others expressed anxiety in public about increasing militarization of the Iranian regime and use of military and paramilitaries to repress popular protests. But Egypt is far more militarized and now is using exactly the same tactics.

The outlines of Hosni Mubarak’s efforts to maintain regime stability and continuity have now become clear. In response to the mass demonstrations of the past week, he has done the following:

  1. Late last week, he first tried to use the uniformed police and secret police to repress the crowds, killing perhaps 200-300 and wounding hundreds.

  2. This effort failed to quell the protests, and the police were then withdrawn altogether, leaving the country defenseless before gangs of burglars and other criminal elements (some of which may have been composed of secret police or paid informers). The public dealt with this threat of lawlessness by organizing self-defense neighborhood patrols, and continued to refuse to stop demonstrating.

  3. Mubarak appointed military intelligence ogre Omar Suleiman vice president. Suleiman had orchestrated the destruction of the Muslim radical movement of the 1990s, but he clearly was being groomed now as a possible successor to Mubarak and his crowd-control expertise would now be used not against al-Qaeda affiliates but against Egyptian civil society.

  4. Mubarak mobilized the army to keep a semblance of order, but failed to convince the regular army officers to intervene against the protesters, with army chief of staff Sami Anan announcing late Monday that he would not order the troops to use force against the demonstrators.

  5. When the protests continued Tuesday, Mubarak came on television and announced that he would not run for yet another term and would step down in September. His refusal to step down immediately and his other maneuvers indicated his determination, and probably that of a significant section of the officer corps, to maintain the military dictatorship in Egypt, but to attempt to placate the public with an offer to switch out one dictator for a new one (Omar Suleiman, likely).

  6. When this pledge of transition to a new military dictator did not, predictably enough, placate the public either, Mubarak on Wednesday sent several thousand secret police and paid enforcers in civilian clothing into Tahrir Square to attack the protesters with stones, knouts, and molotov cocktails, in hopes of transforming a sympathetic peaceful crowd into a menacing violent mob. This strategy is similar to the one used in summer of 2009 by Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to raise the cost of protesting in the streets of Tehran, when they sent in basij (volunteer pro-regime militias). Used consistently and brutally, this show of force can raise the cost of urban protesting and gradually thin out the crowds.

Note that this step number 6 required that the army agree to remain neutral and not to actively protect the crowds. The secret police goons were allowed through army checkpoints with their staves, and some even rode through on horses and camels. Aljazeera English’s correspondent suggests that the military was willing to allow the protests to the point where Mubarak would agree to stand down, but the army wants the crowd to accept that concession and go home now.