palestina
palestina:

American peace activist Rachel Corrie being interviewed in the Rafah refugee camp in Gaza Strip a few days before she was killed by an Israeli bulldozer. [Photograph: Getty Images] 
 
Rachel Corrie case: Israeli soldier to testify anonymously

will we ever see justice for Rachel Corrie and her family? not as long as Israel is the one dealing out justice.

palestina:

American peace activist Rachel Corrie being interviewed in the Rafah refugee camp in Gaza Strip a few days before she was killed by an Israeli bulldozer. [Photograph: Getty Images] 

Rachel Corrie case: Israeli soldier to testify anonymously

will we ever see justice for Rachel Corrie and her family? not as long as Israel is the one dealing out justice.

qexwejbey:

afghanipoppy:

The transaction would involve providing or refurbishing some 150 F-15 fighter jets as well as selling Saudi Arabia dozens of Black Hawk and Apache helicopters, and, probably at a later date, naval and missile defense assets.

Following discussions between Robert Gates, US defence secretary, and Ehud Barak, his Israeli counterpart, Washington has agreed to restrict the F-15s’ capability to hit distant targets, so as to pose less of a threat to Israel.

Last month the US also announced a deal worth up to $15.2bn in which it would sell Israel F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, which are more advanced than the F-15.

“We have discussed this issue within the broader context of the US’s commitment to maintain Israel’s military edge and, even though we are not thrilled about it, the US has taken note of our concerns,” said an Israeli official.

This is all being done to stabilize an Iranian nuclear threat. Hey America, here’s a crazy idea, why don’t you try denuclearizing yourself and Israel first rather than loading up more shiny toys for the lunatics in Saudiya?

The regional arms build-up also contrasts with the actions of some of the US’s most trusted allies in western Europe, which are in the process of carrying out arms cuts. The UK on Tuesday announced plans to reduce defence spending by 8 per cent by 2015.

Can we start a blog dedicated to trying to figure out who is more evil, the Zionists or the House of Sa’ud? Not that it matters since they are BFF and all, but it would make a pretty rage-filled blog.

mohandasgandhi
mohandasgandhi:

Is war really worth it?
With the 9 year anniversary of our war in Afghanistan, here are some facts:
Nearly 6 in 10 Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, according to a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation study released this week.
Afghanistan is the world’s 3rd poorest country with a GDP of $27.01 billion.
There are more private contractors (120,000) than there are troops currently deployed.
As of June 2010 1,832 total soldiers have been killed in Afghanistan. 
Last fiscal year, 239 soldiers killed themselves, 160 of them active duty.
146 soldiers died from high-risk activities, including 74 drug  overdoses, and 1,713 soldiers survived suicide attempts, according to an  Army report.
A third of returning troops report mental problems and 18.5 per cent of  all returning service members are battling either PTSD or depression,  according to a study by the Rand Corporation.
Amputations rose from 47 in 2009 to 77 through Sept. 23 of this year, or an increase of more than 60% - mostly caused by IEDs, according to Army reports.
A recent Pentagon report said IEDs are now the “the most serious threat”  to coalition forces, killing 6,200 allied and Afghan troops in fiscal  year 2009, compared with 3,800 in 2008.
Over the last year the number of child casualties has risen by 55%.
Nearly 6,000 civilians have died since 2006 and over 2,000 have died this year alone.
It costs the Pentagon $2 billion     per month to support the American troops.
To date, $1.09 trillion dollars have been allocated to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The death of each Taliban fighter costs between $50-100 million. That’s, at the very least, $1 billion per 20 Taliban fighters.  The best estimate of Taliban killed annually by coalition forces is roughly 2,000.  Killing the estimated 35,000 Taliban fighting the occupation would cost $1.75 trillion.
The poverty rate in Afghanistan is 36%, unemployment, 35%, and inflation, 30.5%.
The population’s life expectancy is 44.4 years.
Is it really worth blowing up Afghanistan?
(Image via)

mohandasgandhi:

Is war really worth it?

With the 9 year anniversary of our war in Afghanistan, here are some facts:

  • Nearly 6 in 10 Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, according to a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation study released this week.
  • Afghanistan is the world’s 3rd poorest country with a GDP of $27.01 billion.
  • There are more private contractors (120,000) than there are troops currently deployed.
  • As of June 2010 1,832 total soldiers have been killed in Afghanistan. 
  • Last fiscal year, 239 soldiers killed themselves, 160 of them active duty.
  • 146 soldiers died from high-risk activities, including 74 drug overdoses, and 1,713 soldiers survived suicide attempts, according to an Army report.
  • A third of returning troops report mental problems and 18.5 per cent of all returning service members are battling either PTSD or depression, according to a study by the Rand Corporation.
  • Amputations rose from 47 in 2009 to 77 through Sept. 23 of this year, or an increase of more than 60% - mostly caused by IEDs, according to Army reports.
  • A recent Pentagon report said IEDs are now the “the most serious threat” to coalition forces, killing 6,200 allied and Afghan troops in fiscal year 2009, compared with 3,800 in 2008.
  • Over the last year the number of child casualties has risen by 55%.
  • Nearly 6,000 civilians have died since 2006 and over 2,000 have died this year alone.
  • It costs the Pentagon $2 billion per month to support the American troops.
  • To date, $1.09 trillion dollars have been allocated to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • The death of each Taliban fighter costs between $50-100 million. That’s, at the very least, $1 billion per 20 Taliban fighters.  The best estimate of Taliban killed annually by coalition forces is roughly 2,000.  Killing the estimated 35,000 Taliban fighting the occupation would cost $1.75 trillion.
  • The poverty rate in Afghanistan is 36%, unemployment, 35%, and inflation, 30.5%.
  • The population’s life expectancy is 44.4 years.

Is it really worth blowing up Afghanistan?

(Image via)

WikiLeaks’ Collateral Murder: U.S. Soldier Ethan McCord’s Eyewitness Story

http://www.mediasanctuary.tv http://www.nationalpeaceconference.org 

U.S. Soldier Ethan McCord speaking about the civilian massacre documented in WikiLeaks’s April 2010 video disclosure of Apache helicopter footage of a New Baghdad attack that took place in 2007, allegedly released by PFC Brad Manning. McCord’s story was delivered to attendees of the United National Peace Conference, which took place in Albany NY the weekend of July 23-25, 2010. Produced by the United National Peace Conference Media Project, powered by The Sanctuary for Independent Media and the Hudson Mohawk Independent Media Center.

Nothing could be further from the truth [Barack Obama’s declaration this week that US combat troops are to be withdrawn from Iraq at the end of the month, and the way the British and American press are heralding it as the real thing; as the “end of the war”]. The US isn’t withdrawing from Iraq at all – it’s rebranding the occupation. Just as George Bush’s war on terror was retitled “overseas contingency operations” when Obama became president, US “combat operations” will be rebadged from next month as “stability operations”.

But as Major General Stephen Lanza, the US military spokesman in Iraq, told the New York Times: “In practical terms, nothing will change”. After this month’s withdrawal, there will still be 50,000 US troops in 94 military bases, “advising” and training the Iraqi army, “providing security” and carrying out “counter-terrorism” missions. In US military speak, that covers pretty well everything they might want to do.
insaniyat

afghanipoppy:

loveeenotwar:

The Hidden Cost of War

In 2003 Donald Rumsfeld estimated a war with Iraq would cost $60 billion. Five years later, the cost of Iraq war operations is over 10 times that figure. So what’s behind the ballooning dollar signs? Joseph E. Stiglitz and Linda J. Bilme’s exhaustedly researched book, “The Three Trillion Dollar War: The True Cost of the Iraq Conflict,” breaks down the price tag, from current debts to the unseen costs we’ll pay for years to come.

Perhaps that’s where all the tax payers’ money goes.

Breaking down what the costs are - like how we spend $5,000/per second.

The cost of “war” pegged at 3.3 TRILLION dollars? $5,000 per SECOND? Isn’t it remarkable how we all can hear figures like that and not, at the very least, feel goosebumps and ones hair standing on end? man, the mechanisms of desensitization that are in place all around us are terrifying.

mohandasgandhi

mohandasgandhi:

claerwen:

brave-slut:

ryking:

Things are getting worse, and the powers that be continue throwing money and lives at the quagmire.

What are we even fighting for over there? What’s the goal? The end game? Do we have one? No. So, can we get the fuck out of there already? How many more of our soldiers have to die before Obama admits the situation is FUBAR?

I’m afraid to even ask for the civilian death count.

abcsoupdot:

other-stuff:

Update - Saudi Arabia: We will not give Israel air corridor for Iran strike Prince Mohammed bin Nawaf refutes Times of London report saying Saudi Arabia practiced standing down its anti-aircraft systems to allow an Israeli bomb run

abcsoupdot : secrets0ciety : tameourways : qexwejbey 

Latest update:

Earlier Saturday, the Times reported that Saudi Arabia has practiced standing down its anti-aircraft systems to allow Israeli warplanes passage on their way to attack Iran’s nuclear installations, adding that the Saudis have allocated a narrow corridor of airspace in the north of the country.

Prince Mohammed bin Nawaf, the Saudi envoy to the U.K. speaking to the London-based Arab daily Asharq al-Awsat, denied that report, saying such a move “would be against the policy adopted and followed by the Kingdom.”

According to Asharq al-Awsat report, bin Nawaf reiterated the Saudi Arabia’s rejection of any violation of its territories or airspace, adding that it would be “illogical to allow the Israeli occupying force, with whom Saudi Arabia has no relations whatsoever, to use its land and airspace.”

if this is true, this is pure evil.

The answer is as simple as it is disturbing. Israeli soldiers are so accustomed to killing Palestinians for the slightest provocation that pulling the trigger is not the last resort — it is often the first resort. A child throwing a stone, a car-driver not slowing quickly enough, a grandmother and her grandchildren because they turned the wrong way coming out of their house during the invasion of Gaza.
qleoca
qleoca:

unburyingthelead:

This bizarre photo is a screen cap from this video made by Chris Floyd.
Unfortunately there are no details available about it, I just found it striking.

World Press Photo of the year 2003  Year 2003  
 Photographer Jean-Marc Bouju  
 Nationality France  
 Organization  / Publication The Associated Press  
 Category World Press Photo of the Year  
 Prize World Press Photo of the Year  
 Date 31-03-2003  
 Country Iraq  
 Place   
 Caption An Iraqi man comforts his four-year-old son  at a holding center for prisoners of war, in the base camp of the US  Army 101st Airborne Division near An Najaf. The boy had become terrified  when, according to orders, his father was hooded and handcuffed. A  soldier later severed the plastic handcuffs so that the man could  comfort his child. Hoods were placed over detainees’ heads because they  were quicker to apply than blindfolds. The military said the bags were  used to disorient prisoners and protect their identities. It is not  known what happened to the man or the boy.  
(via http://www.archive.worldpressphoto.org/search/layout/result/indeling/detailwpp/form/wpp/q/ishoofdafbeelding/true/trefwoord/year/2003)

qleoca:

unburyingthelead:

This bizarre photo is a screen cap from this video made by Chris Floyd.

Unfortunately there are no details available about it, I just found it striking.

World Press Photo of the year 2003 


  • Year 2003 
  • Photographer Jean-Marc Bouju 
  • Nationality France 
  • Organization / Publication The Associated Press 
  • Category World Press Photo of the Year 
  • Prize World Press Photo of the Year 
  • Date 31-03-2003 
  • Country Iraq 
  • Place  
  • Caption An Iraqi man comforts his four-year-old son at a holding center for prisoners of war, in the base camp of the US Army 101st Airborne Division near An Najaf. The boy had become terrified when, according to orders, his father was hooded and handcuffed. A soldier later severed the plastic handcuffs so that the man could comfort his child. Hoods were placed over detainees’ heads because they were quicker to apply than blindfolds. The military said the bags were used to disorient prisoners and protect their identities. It is not known what happened to the man or the boy. 

(via http://www.archive.worldpressphoto.org/search/layout/result/indeling/detailwpp/form/wpp/q/ishoofdafbeelding/true/trefwoord/year/2003)

azspot

azspot:

Brian Casler, a corporal in the Marines, spoke of witnessing the prevalent dehumanizing outlook soldiers took toward Iraqis during the invasion of Iraq.

“… on these convoys, I saw Marines defecate into MRE bags or urinate in bottles and throw them at children on the side of the road,” he stated.

Scott Ewing, who served in Iraq from 2005-2006, admitted on one panel that units intentionally gave candy to Iraqi children for reasons other than “winning hearts and minds.

“There was also another motive,” Ewing said. “If the kids were around our vehicles, the bad guys wouldn’t attack. We used the kids as human shields.”

remuslumpen

bradicalmang:

iisabelle:vruz:

Wikileaks posts combat video from Iraq showing civilian casualties

WARNING: HORRIBLE STUFF, WATCH WITH CARE

—via Maddow and Wikileaks

Wikileaks

has just released what it describes as classified video from U.S. Apache helicopters in a July 12, 2007 attack on the suburb of New Baghdad, Iraq. The U.S. military has said that the dozen or so casualties were “anti-Iraqi forces” or “insurgents.” The nonprofit Sunshine Press, which runs Wikileaks,

reports

:

Wikileaks has obtained and decrypted this previously unreleased video footage from a US Apache helicopter in 2007. It shows Reuters journalist Namir Noor-Eldeen, driver Saeed Chmagh, and several others as the Apache shoots and kills them in a public square in Eastern Baghdad. They are apparently assumed to be insurgents. After the initial shooting, an unarmed group of adults and children in a minivan arrives on the scene and attempts to transport the wounded. They are fired upon as well. The official statement on this incident initially listed all adults as insurgents and claimed the US military did not know how the deaths ocurred.

After losing two of its own people in the attack, Reuters had been trying to get the video using the Freedom of Information Act, the Sunshine Press reports. The footage is tough stuff.

if anything is worth reblogging (more than once), it would be this video.